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Last hospitalized Michigan school shooting victim leaves ICU

(OXFORD, Mich.) — More than a week after the mass shooting at Oxford High School in Michigan, the last remaining hospitalized victim has left the intensive care unit, authorities said Thursday.

The hospitalized student is one of 11 people who were shot, four fatally, at the school on Nov. 30. She has been moved to a “standard room” at St. Joseph Mercy Oakland Hospital, according to Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe. The 17-year-old student, who has not been identified, is expected to remain hospitalized for another four to six weeks during her rehabilitation, McCabe said in a statement.

Six students and a teacher were among those wounded in the shooting. Four students were killed in what prosecutors allege was a premeditated attack.

The suspected shooter, 15-year-old Ethan Crumbley, a sophomore at the high school, faces multiple charges, including four counts of first-degree murder and seven counts of assault with intent to murder, after allegedly pulling a semiautomatic handgun out of his backpack and firing it in the school’s hallway. His parents, James and Jennifer Crumbley, have also each been charged with four counts of involuntary manslaughter in connection with the shooting. All three have pleaded not guilty to their charges.

On Thursday, the family of two students at the school, including one shot during the attack, filed a $100 million lawsuit against the Oxford Community School District and various school employees, alleging they enabled the suspected shooter in the days and hours before the shooting.

Riley Franz, a 17-year-old senior, was struck in the neck, while her sister, Bella Franz, a 14-year-old freshman, stood next to her and “narrowly escaped the bullets discharged toward her, her sister and her friends,” according to the complaint filed in Detroit federal court on behalf of the sisters.

“We’re going to hold people responsible for betraying the trust we put in them to protect our children,” the family’s attorney, Geoffrey Fieger, said during a press event announcing the lawsuit Thursday. “We’re going to hold every one of them responsible.”

The suit charges that Oxford Community Schools downplayed social media threats allegedly made by Crumbley prior to the shooting, including “countdowns and threats of bodily harm, including death … warning of violent tendencies and murderous ideology prior to actually coming to school with the handgun and ammunition to perpetuate the slaughter,” the complaint stated.

It also alleges school staff acted recklessly by letting him return to class after a meeting with his parents over violent drawings just hours before students were gunned down.

The district is not commenting on the allegations in the lawsuit at the request of the prosecutor to “avoid compromising” the court proceedings, according to a letter its attorney, Timothy Mullins, sent to Fieger on Thursday. “Furthermore, to allow the entire community the ability to heal, I have no intention of litigating this matter in the media,” Mullins wrote.

School leaders have said Crumbley’s parents refused to take him home after the meeting, and because he lacked a disciplinary record, they sent him back to class.

Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald, who brought charges against the suspected shooter and his parents, said she has not ruled out charging school officials.

In a letter to the school community Wednesday, Oxford Community Schools Superintendent Tim Throne said the district has been “fully cooperative” with the county investigation into the school shooting.

He has also called for a third-party investigation into all of Crumbley’s communication with students and staff leading up to the shooting. In his letter Wednesday, he noted he would recommend to the district school board “a review of our entire system.”

The district plans to welcome students, except for high schoolers, back to the classroom Friday for the first time since the deadly shooting. The half-day is part of a “safe, slow and soft re-opening,” and students will be greeted by an increased law enforcement presence, therapy dogs and trauma specialists, Throne said in a letter to families on Thursday.

Backpacks will not be allowed in buildings through at least the end of the next week, the superintendent added.

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